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Synopsis: Every year, millions of Americans are incarcerated before even being convicted of a crime – all because they can’t afford to post bail. How did we get here?

“Trapped: Cash Bail in America” shines a light on our deeply flawed criminal justice system and the activists working to reform it. This new documentary explores the growing movement to end the inherent economic and racial inequalities of cash bail while highlighting victims impacted by an unjust system, the tireless campaigners fighting for criminal justice reform, and a bail industry lobbying to maintain the status quo.

Genre

Social Justice

Language

English

Run Time

63 min minutes

Directed by

Garrett Hubbard

Written by

Chris L. Jenkins

Director's Bio

Garrett Hubbard is a visual storyteller because he believes in the power of authentic stories. He utilizes both video and still photography to connect his clients with their audience. Garrett believes that visual storytelling is the language that saturates our reality, and that stories revealing truth can change lives.

Garrett learned from some of the best storytellers out there—journalists. He has spent the past four years cultivating a documentary and narrative driven video style mixed with an artful photographic vision at USA TODAY. This work has taken him to the White House, the Olympics, The Royal Wedding, and many other places around the world. Prior to joining the USA TODAY staff, he had the opportunity to tell stories for The Washington Post and The New York Times.

Garrett’s work has been honored by some of the most prestigious awards in journalism including the National Press Photographers Association and White House News Photographers Association. These awards have landed him in the Oval Office twice to shake the President’s hand (Garrett opted instead for a fist bump and a high-five). These awards have given him a platform to speak around the country to teach others about the art of visual storytelling. More important than the recognition, Garrett has seen his work bring relief and partnership to some of the most difficult places on earth.

Chris L. Jenkins is an award winning journalist, producer and executive producer whose work has covered politics, poverty and social policy over a 17-year career as a reporter and editor at The Washington Post and independent filmmaker.

As a Post editor, he supervised the paper’s local political and criminal justice reporters, where he led award winning journalism on police involved shootings in the Washington, D.C. area and the rise of the Black Lives Matter Movement. As a reporter he covered immigration, social policy and politics, including the 2004 presidential election. He also served as Managing Editor for the online magazine, The Root.

He is also the co-founder and executive producer of “BrotherSpeak: Exploring the Lives of Black Men”, an award winning 5-part video series published on The Washington Post website, which is now being turned into a full length docu-series. As an independent filmmaker, his short films include Rikers: Innocence Lost, upcoming productions for YouTube Originals and A&E and several political and social justice campaigns.

Country of Origin

United States

Production Year

2020

Official Website

Facebook

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