How to Get Into a Film Festival: The Basics
How To Get Into a Film Festival Okay, so you have a short film that you have made. Congratulations!!! This is a huge step that you have taken. You are either incredibly excited or completely exhausted. Probably a little of both! So what do you do now??? You have a film that you are incredibly proud of and you want to get it out there to be seen by your peers as well as by industry people. Hopefully this will lead to more work. I have 4 films that have gone to film festivals…so let me tell you how I did it. Maybe you can get an idea of what the process will be.   What Festival Do I Submit To??? – I think that this is where most young filmmakers make their first mistake. They submit their films to Sundance, and Toronto and Cannes and Berlin…All the major festivals. Now this is great, but odds are that this will be a waste of money. First, you need to determine who your audience is. Is your film a horror film? Is it a film made for women by women? Is it a family drama? Is it a documentary? I only ask you this because it is a waste of your entrance fee if you submit a family drama to a horror festival. And vice-versa. Once you get a firm idea of your audience, then you will have narrowed your niche of festivals to submit to. What Platform Do I Use? – There are 2 widely used submission platforms that you can use. I started out using Withoutabox.com for my submissions, but then moved to Film Freeway. Here are several of the main differences.   Fees [...]
by Leo Cohen (and Susanna Williams, in spirit) An ongoing series in which our intrepid bloggers ventures to the cheap seats (as seen in Don Jon) to give a film a second chance.  Should they have seen it upon initial release or should they have waited for video?  This week they took a trip to see Michael Bay get back to a human level of blowing things up in 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi. Synopsis:   A security team tries to make sense of the chaos caused when an American ambassador is killed during an attack on a U.S. compound in Libya. Did you have an interest in this film when it initially came out? LC:   Not really.  I figured I'd see it eventually, but the premise, director and trailer made it so I basically figure out what the entire film would be like without having to see it.  I was interested in seeing Jim from The Office (John Krasinski) as an action hero and to see him partner up with his rival for Pam's affections, Roy (David Denman). SW:  Why didn't you see the film when it was first released? LC:   For the reasons listed above.  At this point, Deadpool and The Witch are the only 2016 releases that I have considered going to before reaching the dollar theater. SW:  Did you like the film? LC:   I did like the film.  Michael Bay knows how to shoot action and here he is able to let the suspenseful nature of the situation take over.  Of course, there are some of those Bay touches that would fit right into a 1940s' WWII propaganda film, but hit with a thud today.  The film flashes back to show Jack (Krasinski) just before he leaves home with his [...]
by Leo Cohen (and Susanna Williams, in spirit) An ongoing series in which our intrepid bloggers ventures to the cheap seats (as seen in Don Jon) to give a film a second chance.  Should they have seen it upon initial release or should they have waited for video?  This week they took a trip to see The Boy, the second of two January horror releases starring actresses from two of televisions biggest (fantasy/genre) shows. Synopsis:   The Walking Dead's Lauren Cohan plays an American nanny who takes a new job only to discover the child of this English family is a life-sized doll.  However, when she violates the strict set of rules on caring for it, disturbing events make her believe the doll is really alive. Did you have an interest in this film when it initially came out? LC:  I was interested because it looked like it could be a good horror film.  I wasn't expecting James Wan level intensity, but it had a classic horror story premise and one that we haven't seen in a while.  I'm a fan of The Walking Dead so I also liked the idea of getting to see Lauren Cohan playing someone other than Maggie.  Finally, as someone generally interested in the film industry I was also curious to see the latest from the newly formed STX Entertainment. SW:  Why didn't you see the film when it was first released? LC:   For reasons stated previously on this blog.  An early January horror release meant I would definitely get a chance to see it at the dollar theater. SW:  Did you like the film? LC:  I did for the very reasons I was interested in seeing it in the first place.  It was cool to see Cohan not have to [...]
by Leo Cohen (and Susanna Williams, in spirit) An ongoing series in which our intrepid bloggers ventures to the cheap seats (as seen in Don Jon) to give a film a second chance.  Should they have seen it upon initial release or should they have waited for video?  This week they took a trip to see the Italian Stallion pass the reigns to the Creed clan. Synopsis:   Former World Heavyweight Champion Rocky Balboa becomes the trainer and mentor of Adonis Johnson, son of his late friend and rival Apollo Creed.   Did you have an interest in this film when it initially came out? LC:  I most definitely did.  I love the original Rocky, fondly remember watching parts of Rocky IV continuously on television (it seemed to be on every weekend), and was surprised by how much I loved Rocky Balboa.  Rocky Balboa was very much a throwback to the original Rocky and somehow was able to capture a lot of the same magic.  I think it was because of that film that I wasn't nearly worried as others may have been at the prospect of a Creed movie.  I'm sure there were a lot of people looking at this film as a shameless money grabbing reboot, but those would have been the same people shaking their heads when Stallone announced he was bringing the character back in 2006.  At that time it would have looked as a former superstar trying one desperate last grasp at the spotlight by bringing back one of his iconic roles.  That may have been the case, but not completely since it didn't seem that desperate.  At least, that did not come across in the slightest in the final project.  Then there [...]
by Leo Cohen (and Susanna Williams, in spirit) An ongoing series in which our intrepid bloggers ventures to the cheap seats (as seen in Don Jon) to give a film a second chance.  Should they have seen it upon initial release or should they have waited for video?  This week they took a trip to see The Forest, the first of two January horror releases starring actresses from two of televisions biggest (fantasy/genre) shows. Synopsis:   Game of Thrones' Natalie Dormer plays a woman who goes into Japan's Suicide Forest to find her twin sister with terrifying results.   Did you have an interest in this film when it initially came out? LC:  Not particularly.  A January horror release isn't normally going to get me rushing out to the theaters, especially since it would surely be at the dollar theater within a couple of months and on DVD before the summer.  I like Natalie Dormer so there was a good chance I would see it eventually, just not right away. SW:  Why didn't you see the film when it was first released? LC:   For the reasons listed above.  I wasn't interested enough in the film to think I would see it before DVD. SW:  Did you like the film? LC:  No, I did not.  The film goes for cheap scares and formulaic jumps instead of something truly creepy, which would actually lend itself perfectly to this setting.  The idea of a suicide forest is a pretty scary idea and becomes exponentially more terrifying when the idea that getting lost in it plays tricks with your head is introduced.  It is one thing for there to be evil spirits in the forest, but what if you couldn't tell evil spirits from hallucinations?  Suddenly you are [...]
2016 Sundance Film Festival Interview with “Sing Street” Director, James Carney
Matt Carey interviews "Sing Street" Director, James Carney and two cast members live at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival.
by Leo Cohen (and Susanna Williams, in spirit)   An ongoing series in which our intrepid bloggers ventures to the cheap seats (as seen in Don Jon) to give a film a second chance.  Should they have seen it upon initial release or should they have waited for video?  This week they took a trip to see SNL besties Tina Fey and Amy Poehler team up as Sisters. Synopsis:   Sisters Kate and Maura Ellis decide to throw one last blowout party -- known as Ellis Island parties -- before their parents sell the family home.   Did you have an interest in this film when it initially came out? LC:  I absolutely did.  I'm a big Tina Fey fan since she first took the Weekend Update reigns in 2000.  I've also liked Poehler since SNL.  Plus, I consider 30 Rock and Parks & Recreation to be two of the best comedies of all time.  The director, Jason Moore, also just happened to direct one of my favorite films of the past few years, Pitch Perfect. SW:  Why didn't you see the film when it was first released? LC:   It came out during the holidays and that just wasn't really a good time to see anything.  I made time for Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens, but, well come on that's Star Wars.  Of course, this film is still playing in regular theaters so I didn't have to wait long.  It's basically like last year when Unbroken was a hit and somehow made it to the dollar theater a month later. SW:  Did you like the film? LC:  Yes!!!  I'm not sure, but I'm pretty sure this was the best comedy of 2015 and right now it could very well be the best [...]
by Leo Cohen (and Susanna Williams, in spirit) An ongoing series in which our intrepid bloggers ventures to the cheap seats (as seen in Don Jon) to give a film a second chance.  Should they have seen it upon initial release or should they have waited for video?  This week they took a trip to see the true meaning of Christmas revealed in the horror-comedy about the holiday spirit that remains in the shadow of Santa Claus, Krampus. Synopsis:   A boy accidentally summons a Christmas demon to his family home. Did you have an interest in this film when it initially came out? LC:  I had mild interest in it.  I liked some of the actors and I was interested in seeing the Krampus legend put on the screen.  I was also intrigued when it did come out and there was a lot of talk of it being reminiscent of those 80's horror-comedy films like Gremlins. SW:  Why didn't you see the film when it was first released? LC:   There really wasn't any time to see it, especially with the holidays. SW:  Did you like the film? LC:  I shouldn't have been so surprised by how much I did like it after the whole 80's talk, but I was.  I really enjoyed this film and loved the risks the film took.  Without giving too much away let's just say there is no way this film could end with everyone living happily ever after.  Krampus and his minions are out for blood and punishment and that's just what they are going to get.  Then there is a sequence in the film when the grandmother explains what is going on by relating her own past run in with the demon.  The whole story is [...]
by Leo Cohen (and Susanna Williams, in spirit) An ongoing series in which our intrepid bloggers ventures to the cheap seats (as seen in Don Jon) to give a film a second chance.  Should they have seen it upon initial release or should they have waited for video?  This week they took a trip to see Team America: World Police's Matt Damon be the smartest man on the planet in The Martian. Synopsis:   A manned mission to Mars leaves astronaut Mark Watney presumed dead and left behind by his crew.  However, Watney is still alive and must now find a way to survive on the hostile planet and send a signal back to Earth.  Did you have an interest in this film when it initially came out? LC:  Absolutely.  It was one of October's big films with a star studded supporting cast while at the same time providing Damon with a chance to put on a one man Cast Away-like show.  Ridley Scott was the director and while I may not like every one of his films I'm always interested to see his next film.  It's also a science fiction film and his three previous films in that genre were Alien, Blade Runner, and Prometheus.  I consider all of those top 10 films of their respective years with the first two classics (time will tell with the last) so a Ridley Scott science fiction film is an even bigger draw.  I also was interested in the fact that it looked to be hard sci-fi, which is something Hollywood has been teasing with the past couple of years (Gravity, Interstellar).  This film looked like it would be the one to go full out in that department just as Ex [...]
7 Questions with CEO / Festival Director / Producer, Benjamin Oberman
7 Questions with CEO, Festival Director, and Producer, Benjamin Oberman 1. FFF: How did you get into the entertainment industry? BENJAMIN: I started as an athlete (pairs) on the US Figure Skating Team. That led to an opportunity working for ABC Sports which lasted two years. I learned a lot, but wasn’t ready to be behind the camera. I had a professional career performing on stage more than one thousand times before catching the producing bug. I started with live production then made for TV sports events. My career evolved into producing scripted TV and film, commercials and documentaries. When I noticed an increasing number of great films failing to reach audiences beyond the film festival circuit, I started a distribution company to improve the system and champion quality films. 2. FFF: What do you like best about your work? BENJAMIN: I love the people I meet and with whom I work. I love the stories they tell and the films I see. I love the creativity involved in all we do and the challenge of connecting films and audiences. 3. FFF: Where do you find inspiration? BENJAMIN: I find inspiration in nature, when hiking, running, and climbing in the mountains, in the quiet moments before the sun rises, and in observing others as I move through life. 4. FFF: How would you describe your style of work? BENJAMIN: I like to work collaboratively. Once I have a clear vision, I’m very strong in building the best team possible with everyone working toward our common goal. I think I have a quiet intensity. I rarely yell or criticize, but I expect everyone to give everything they have and to execute at the highest degree. I pull [...]
I'm a big Quentin Tarantino fan. Watching Pulp Fiction at the Chinese Theatre in Hollywood in 1994 is one of my fondest moviegoing memories. Seeing Inglourious Basterds in Cannes is another. Jackie Brown -- loved it. Django Unchained -- ditto. So I was excited to see The Hateful Eight at a screening in LA a couple of weeks ago (reviews were embargoed until Dec. 21). I wish I could say it lives up to his previous work, but I found the film curiously disappointing. The visuals are up to the QT standard -- he shot it in 70mm, rendering the outdoor scenes spectacular, although it must be said that most of the action takes places inside a remote cabin. The story unfolds sometime after the Civil War, with a bounty hunter (Kurt Russell) transporting a prisoner (Jennifer Jason Leigh) by stagecoach to an appointment with a hangman. A Civil War vet named Marquis Warren (Samuel L. Jackson) hitches a ride with them until an approaching blizzard forces the party to seek shelter at Minnie's Haberdashery in the middle of nowhere. Several possibly shady characters are already holed up at Minnie's, played by Bruce Dern, Walton Goggins, Michael Madsen, Tim Roth and Demian Bichir. There isn't much action for the first hour and change, but then the usual Tarantino violence explodes on screen. I've been willing to put up with the over-the-top bloodshed in his movies because of what I find so pleasurable in them -- the dialogue. Christoph Waltz was furnished with brilliant speeches in both Inglourious Basterds and Django Unchained and delivered them with such aplomb that he won Oscars for both roles. There is great scene after great scene in those movies, all built around Tarantino's exceptional gift with [...]
For his documentary Cartel Land director Matthew Heineman wanted to get exclusive footage of Mexican drug dealers at work. So he made an arrangement with meth cookers in Michoacán. "Their rule was that they didn't want their faces to be shown and my rule was that I didn't want to be bagged or thrown in the back of a trunk," Heineman told an audience at a screening at Creative Artists Agency in LA. "I thought that was a pretty fair exchange." That quote gives a sense of the kind of peril he faced to make his film, which has been shortlisted for the Oscars and nominated for numerous critics' awards. The International Documentary Association (IDA) recently gave Heineman its "Courage Under Fire" award, in recognition of the danger he faced. "He was careful as he possibly could be," Academy Award-winning director Kathryn Bigelow said in presenting the Courage award to Heineman. "But he knew risking his life was perhaps a bit of a necessity to make this film." Bigelow signed on as executive producer of Cartel Land before its theatrical release last summer. "I just thought it was a great movie. Wanted to be involved, wanted to help. Met Matt and I was extraordinarily impressed," Bigelow told the CAA audience. Heineman explained how he became involved in the project, which offers a visceral look at the rise of self-defense groups that have sprung up on both sides of the border in response to the explosion of cartel violence. "I first heard about this story through this Rolling Stone [magazine] article that I read and it just completely captivated me. I knew nothing about the border. I kew nothing about the drug war. I knew  nothing about vigilantism," Heineman said. "These were all things that fascinated [...]
by Leo Cohen (and Susanna Williams, in spirit) An ongoing series in which our intrepid bloggers ventures to the cheap seats (as seen in Don Jon) to give a film a second chance.  Should they have seen it upon initial release or should they have waited for video?  This week they took a trip to see Emily Blunt build on the badassery she displayed in The Edge of Tomorrow with the action thriller Sicario. Synopsis:   An idealistic FBI agent is enlisted by a task force to aid the escalating war on drugs at the border between the U.S. and Mexico. Did you have an interest in this film when it initially came out? LC:  Yes.  I loved Prisoners and liked Enemy, Incendies and Maelstrom, previous films from director Denis Villeneuve, and am very curious about the upcoming Blade Runner sequel.  In fact, while I have an immediate hesitation to the Blade Runner project in that I don't want to see an older Harrison Ford and have it definitely answer whether he was a replicant or find out what happened to Rachael, I feel that Villeneuve is one of the only handful of people that put my mind at ease.  There is something about his work that makes me believe he would thrive in this world.  Obviously, Benicio Del Toro is a terrific actor and has been for a long time now and Josh Brolin has deserved the success he's received the past 10 years, but Emily Blunt is the real draw.  After breaking out independently in My Summer of Love and commercially in The Devil Wears Prada she has fought to break out as a headliner while Hollywood tried to put her into their ready-made boxes.  After [...]
We've got a ways to go before the Oscars, but it's already looking like a two-film race for Best Documentary. Asif Kapadia's Amy, about the late singer Amy Winehouse, and Joshua Oppenheimer's The Look of Silence, about the unresolved trauma of the Indonesian genocide of 1965, have divvied up most of the pre-Oscar critics awards. On Monday, the Washington Area Film Critics Association named Amy Best Documentary, a day after the Los Angeles Film Critics Association did likewise. But on Saturday night, it was The Look of Silence which claimed the best documentary prize at the prestigious IDA Awards in Hollywood, winning over Amy. The Look of Silence also won top doc honors in late November at the Gotham Independent Film Awards. I recently saw Amy and found the film so moving. I wanted to reach through the screen and grab this extraordinarily talented but vulnerable creature, to save her from the people around her -- and I'm sure that's a sentiment many viewers felt. I haven't seen The Look of Silence yet (I'm embarrassed to say), but I will soon. I got to speak with Joshua Oppenheimer after the IDA Awards and he seemed incredibly gracious. There are so many remarkable people who work in the documentary sphere (not to get all gooey about it) -- motivated not by the prospect of big paydays but of doing something artistically and culturally relevant. Good on them!
by Leo Cohen (and Susanna Williams, in spirit) An ongoing series in which our intrepid bloggers ventures to the cheap seats (as seen in Don Jon) to give a film a second chance.  Should they have seen it upon initial release or should they have waited for video?  This week they took a trip to see a very romantic tale as only Guillermo del Toro can tell it -- filled with ghosts and gore -- in the gothic romance Crimson Peak. Synopsis:   Having witnessed the warning of her dead mother, aspiring author Edith Cushing fills her writing with the supernatural.  When a mysterious outsider sweeps her off her feet and brings her back to his house.  Filled with as many secrets as its owner, this house breathes and bleeds.  Now it is up to Edith to unravel the mystery of Crimson Peak before her ominous new sister-in-law can stop her. Did you have an interest in this film when it initially came out? LC:  Of course.  I've enjoyed all of Guillermo del Toro's films.  Although I'm mixed on Pacific Rim I still liked that film to an extent and this one seemed to be del Toro returning to more of his horror roots.  Granted the film was actually Guillermo del Toro making his own Gothic Romance film -- despite the haunted house horror film the marketing department tried to sell -- it had the ghosts, big scary house, and sinister looking Jessica Chastain. SW:  Why didn't you see the film when it was first released? LC:  For reasons stated before on this blog and considering how the film flopped it seemed pointless to rush out to see the film.  It wasn't in the the major theaters for very long and [...]
7 Questions is profession incline oriented skateboarder, Arian Chamasmany
1. FFF: How did you get into your industry (skateboard/filmmaker)? ARIAN: I got into skateboarding as an alternative to surfing way back when. When there weren't any waves, it was fun to go cruise around and carve down hills. Years later the whole discipline of Downhill Skateboarding became mainstream and we happened to be on the cusp of the whole thing. Going fast on our boards was just us trying to push the boundaries of what we originally had never thought possible. At the time, I was going to school for photography, so documenting the whole scenario as it played out felt like the next step to connecting my pursuits with my passion. 2. FFF: What do you like best about producing films? ARIAN: I genuinely enjoy the process, the mission. The most exciting part of production was always the story and the creative journey behind making it happen. Whether it was us renting a van and driving out to the middle of the woods to skate some road we found via satellite mapping, or spending 12 hours waiting for a connecting flight in a Turkish airport in order to get to an event, every single time the adventure became the take away. So for me, the best kind of films are the films that tell the story. Taking the time to exhibit the story telling angle in the best way possible, and that is what I like best about producing films. 3. FFF: Where do you find inspiration? ARIAN: A lot of the origins of my creative inspiration come from the tricks of the trade my late mother taught me about the process of self expression. My mother was herself, a creative [...]
by Leo Cohen The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 is the fourth and final film in the franchise that has torn apart the box office over the past few years and spawned an industry of adaptation imitators.  While the YA adaptation market in one form or another had been box office gold for some time, The Hunger Games gave Hollywood a clear cut formula.  Boy Wizards and Vampire-Werewolf love triangles aren't really something you can replicate.  Maybe a magic fantasy or supernatural one-off film, but not another series.  When The Hunger Games hit the big screen it was the same year Twilight came to an end with The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2, which had followed Harry Potter's lead the previous year of breaking the final book into two films.  The Hunger Games would follow those films in breaking its last act into two films as well.  It also had as much of a love triangle as Twilight and some pretty fantastical elements like both its predecessors.  Except The Hunger Games went a more science fiction route dealing with a dystopian future in which the fate of the world rested on the shoulders of one girl.  Tris Prior took over Katniss Everdeen's original March release date in 2014 with the first Divergent film and a month later it was announced the third book would also be split into two films.  The Host may have been one of those one-off adaptations (from the author of Twilight, no less), but the concept of a girl versus the new alien overlords feels more Katniss versus the Panem status quo than who Bella's going to take to the prom.  The Maze Runner took the [...]
by Leo Cohen   Bond, James Bond.  Brown, Charlie Brown.  The two seem to be miles apart.  One gets all the girls.  The other is a blockhead whose interactions with girls consists of getting a football yanked away at the last possible second, being called a blockhead, and always losing the nerve to talk to the Little Red-Haired Girl.  Sure Bond gets his fair share of girls trying to kill him, but Brown has Peppermint Patty's half serious advances to deal with and let's see Bond try to take on Peppermint Patty.  Bond does death-defying stunts.  Brown does death-defying stumbles.  One is the epitome of cool.  The other is the epitome of hapless.  Then again both are popular characters that have made a mark through various media (print, film, games) and have been around for over sixty years.  While the Charlie Brown name was used a few times in the Peanuts predecessor, Li'l Folks, Charlie Brown and Peanuts proper weren't introduced until 1950.  Three years later James Bond appeared in print as well.  While both made their "film" debuts in the fifties, Bond was part of a television play that made him American (Jimmy Bond) in '54 and the Peanuts crew were animated in Ford commercials in '59, it wouldn't be until the 1960's when they made their real mark.  The James Bond we know and love debuted in 1962 with Dr. No while it was Charlie Brown's turn to wait 3 years for A Charlie Brown Christmas to hit CBS.  Both film and Christmas special would forever change the two characters making them both immensely popular and for a very, very long time.  Now the two have shared the top of [...]
by Leo Cohen (and Susanna Williams, in spirit) An ongoing series in which our intrepid bloggers ventures to the cheap seats (as seen in Don Jon) to give a film a second chance.  Should they have seen it upon initial release or should they have waited for video?  This week they took a trip to see Johnny Depp play South Boston's infamous James "Whitey" Bulger in Black Mass. Synopsis:   The story of Whitey Bulger, brother of a state senator and South Boston's most notorious criminal, who became an FBI informant (w/very little informing) to take down the Mafia invading his turf and literally getting away with murder with his informant status. Did you have an interest in this film when it initially came out? LC:  Not really.  I like Johnny Depp, but aside from his stuff with Tim Burton or the Pirates of the Caribbean movies (although I didn't like the last one at all) I end up waiting for home video to see his stuff.  I also wasn't interested in a dramatized account of the Whitey Bulger because I didn't think the story would be handled correctly.  I figured we would get a by the numbers gangster film that used the unique case of Bulger as the hook instead of delving into the politics and what was going on at the FBI to allow the Winter Hill Gang to thrive.  I also figured it would make Bulger this big bad -- and he definitely was a bad guy and did become a mob boss -- instead of showing him as a two-bit thug turned small-time hood that got the deal of the century with the feds and allowed him to take over all of Boston from [...]
When I worked with correspondent Michael Ware at CNN we knew him as fearless. Actually, I think our term for him was "madman." The Aussie journalist reported from Mexico at the height of the narco-violence at great personal risk, charging in where others feared to tread. And he did the same during the bloodiest phases of the Iraq War, working first for Time magazine and later for CNN. He reported there for SEVEN years, the equivalent for a soldier of about five or six tours of duty. "Nothing can ever replicate that hyper life, the brotherhood, the camaraderie, the clarity, the simplicity, the horror, the pain..." --reporter Michael Ware on his experience in Iraq And if you believe life for a war correspondent is totally different than for a soldier you may think differently after seeing Ware's new documentary Only the Dead (See the End of War), which he co-directed with Bill Guttentag. The film is composed mostly of hand-held verité footage Ware shot while on the ground, and it's brutal, heart-pounding stuff. Incinerated bodies, explosions, dead-of-night encounters with insurgents, wounded Iraqi fighters taking their last agonizing breaths -- supplemented by the occasional video, shot by insurgents, of a beheading. The documentary opens December 4th in LA and New York; it recently qualified for Oscar consideration, along with 123 other feature documentaries. I talked with Ware after a screening in LA where he essentially said he experienced PTSD after leaving Iraq. "There was a time where all I did was long to be back in Iraq and in the war. And it was hard to do, to stop hearing that call of the wild, but I have. I’ve made it back home," he told me. "And it may not be pretty, it may be bruised, it may be scarred [...]

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